Lyme Disease in Pets: Facts and Prevention

Lyme disease is the most common vector borne disease in the United States. The CDC estimates that over 300,000 people are infected each year, and Pennsylvania leads the nation in the number of cases reported.

Our dogs are also at risk for Lyme disease. Caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, it is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick. If left untreated, Lyme disease can cause heart complications, joint disease, and permanent nervous system damage.

Before you go out in the woods this summer, take a moment to brush up on the basics of Lyme disease in pets and how to prevent it.

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Spring Safety for Pets

Our pets are often adventurous and playful, and we love that about them! But sometimes pets get into things they shouldn’t. As we spring into a new season, your team at Fairview Veterinary Hospital would like to touch on spring safety for pets. Below are some of our top tips for keeping your pet healthy and well, and avoiding a pet emergency.

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Who’s The Top Chef For Pets? Pet Nutrition Guidelines

If you’ve been a pet owner or even if you have a brand new pet, you may have noticed a plethora of information out there (especially online) about pet food and pet nutrition. The internet abounds with advice, marketing, and guidance for pet owners about what they should feed their pets. How is a conscientious pet owner to make a decision about what to feed?

But wait. It should be easy, right? Pour the food into their bowl and that’s it? Not quite. Pets have specific nutritional requirements that need to be met in order for them to thrive.


Before your throw up your hands in confusion, have no fear. Fairview Veterinary Hospital has the scoop (no pun intended) on pet nutrition.

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Keep Chocolate Where it Belongs and Prevent a Pet Poisoning

Chocolate toxicity in pets can cause a pet poisoning emergency

Preventing a pet poisoning is important throughout the year, but as we head toward Valentine’s Day and Easter, providing a few safety reminders is always a good idea. While we all do our best to protect our pets accidents do happen. Knowing the red flags of toxicity is a must, as well as training ourselves on how to react when a pet is in peril.

It’s Chemistry

The reason that chocolate is toxic to animals is because it contains the compound theobromine. Different chocolates have different concentrations of theobromine. For example, the darker the chocolate, the more theobromine it contains. Dark chocolate, cocoa powder, baker’s chocolate, and products with a high percentage of cacao are particularly dangerous. Milk chocolate has less, but that doesn’t mean it’s safe to leave out for your pet to sample!

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Fairview Veterinary Hospital Reflects on the Top 5 Pet Care Blogs of 2018

Urgent Care

The bedrock of any successful business is, of course, the people. Without the friendly, caring, and compassionate folks that keep us going strong each day, our medical expertise and years of experience wouldn’t have as much impact.

Indeed, our team strives each day to help animals in our ever-growing community. We are rewarded tenfold for our efforts with enthusiastic tail wags, face licks, purrs, and head bumps. To the pet owners of Erie, Pennsylvania, we thank you for allowing us the privilege of caring for your companion.

We also want to thank you for reading our pet care blogs. Each month, we discuss topics and address common questions facing many pet owners. From dispelling myths to raising awareness, our pet care blogs are meant to help and inform readers.

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What to Think About Before Giving a Pet to Someone You Love

Giving a pet as a gift is not the best strategy, consider adopting later in the year, instead

Giving a pet as a holiday gift can be a sweet gesture, but this type of generosity can create unforeseen challenges. For instance, unless the gift giver plans on daily involvement and long-term pet care, it’s a lot to ask for someone to instantly take on the demands of pet ownership – even if they’ve dropped hints that they’d love one for the holidays.

There are great alternatives to this common (but not always successful) practice, and we’re here to support the causes of adoption, fostering and donating during the most wonderful time of the year.

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Canine Parvovirus: Deadly But Preventable

Canine Parvovirus is a serious threat to dog healthAt Fairview Veterinary Hospital, few things make us more sad than a sick puppy…the only exception being a sick puppy who we could have protected from getting sick in the first place. Canine parvovirus is nothing to take lightly, but dog owners who take the time to learn a little bit about it can do a lot to protect their pet.

Understanding Canine Parvovirus

Parvovirus is a type of virus that can infect many different species. Human parvovirus commonly results in Fifth disease, feline parvovirus results in panleukopenia, and canine parvovirus results in a serious gastrointestinal infection commonly just called parvo.

Thankfully human parvovirus does not make dogs sick, and vice versa. This doesn’t mean that parvo is something to ignore.

Dogs who are infected with canine parvovirus become very sick due to the virus’s effect on the body. The virus causes: Continue…

Planning Ahead for Fall Pet Safety

Practicing fall pet safety is a great keep your pet safe.Changing leaves, crisp breezes, and pumpkin-spiced everything are just a few of the reasons we love fall. Pets also enjoy the cooler temps and interesting smells in the air this time of year. But beware! Seasonal dangers can put them at risk. Fortunately, with our fall pet safety tips, you can keep their tails wagging and avoid an unwanted scare.

Halloween Hazards

The best way to enjoy Halloween with your pet is to make sure they stay safe! Continue…

Benefits of Microchipping Your Pet

Microchipping your pet helps a lost pet become a found pet! Even with the most diligent of owners, pet escapes can and do happen. All it takes is a gardener accidentally leaving the back gate open, or the front door being opened just enough for your pet to scoot through.

Statistics show that one in three pets will become lost at some point during their lifetime. And without identification, 90% will not return home. Those are some scary statistics! Microchipping your pet is not only easy, safe, and inexpensive, it also affords lost pets their best chance of being reunited with their owner.

How Does A Microchip Work?

A microchip is a rice-sized device that is implanted under your pet’s skin during their annual wellness exam. The microchip stores a unique ID number that can be used to retrieve your contact information if your pet is ever lost.

Once the microchip is placed, it is registered with the national pet recovery database with your contact information. If your pet is lost, any veterinary hospital, shelter, or rescue organization can scan your pet for the microchip, pull up the ID code, and call the microchip company, who then contacts you with your pet’s location.

Microchips work with radio frequency, so there are no moving parts or batteries. The radio frequency is only activated when a microchip scanner is waved over your pet’s body. Continue…

The Critical Reality – and Importance – of Pet Parasite Prevention

Pet parasite prevention is key to pet health and pet wellness.Parasites. The word alone gives most people the creeps. No one wants to play host to a blood-sucking bug, but most animals in the wild aren’t able to defend themselves against parasites. Whether internal or external, we can all agree that parasite prevention is important for the pets we know and love. Without a proactive, diligent approach, serious health problems may be the outcome of this costly gamble.

Cause and Effect

Parasites are awful in that they thrive at their host’s expense and are responsible for spreading harmful diseases. Luckily, with consistent monitoring and the right dose of medication, serious health problems are kept at bay, protecting both pets and their owners. What’s more, parasite prevention is less costly than treating illnesses spread by fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes. Continue…